Yes No Maybe So by Becky Albertalli & Aisha Saeed | Book Review

Hello, book lovers! 💕

The following is from Goodreads:

YES
Jamie Goldberg is cool with volunteering for his local state senate candidate—as long as he’s behind the scenes. When it comes to speaking to strangers (or, let’s face it, speaking at allto almost anyone), Jamie’s a choke artist. There’s no way he’d ever knock on doors to ask people for their votes…until he meets Maya.

NO
Maya Rehman’s having the worst Ramadan ever. Her best friend is too busy to hang out, her summer trip is canceled, and now her parents are separating. Why her mother thinks the solution to her problems is political canvassing—with some awkward dude she hardly knows—is beyond her.

MAYBE SO
Going door to door isn’t exactly glamorous, but maybe it’s not the worst thing in the world. After all, the polls are getting closer—and so are Maya and Jamie. Mastering local activism is one thing. Navigating the cross-cultural romance of the century is another thing entirely
.

My thoughts

So when I heard that Becky Albertalli was coming out with a new book, I knew right away that I needed to preorder it. Because every book that woman writes is amazing in my mind. Though I had never read anything by Aisha Saeed, after reading this book, I’d definitely be likely to check out her books in the future.

But in terms of this book, I wound up picking up the audiobook, because apparently I can’t get through a book otherwise. I have an addiction to listening to audiobooks lately, but that’s besides the point. I really enjoyed listening to this while reading along.

I loved this story so much. Even though I’m not huge on politics, this book didn’t throw it in your face. Yes, the main characters went canvassing for their senate. And yes, there were some serious issues being discussed. But those topics were discussed in a way that wasn’t in your face. The authors didn’t try to force the issues down your throat. They handled it well where as a reader, you understood and felt for the characters’ views on the topics. And, at least for me, I ultimately sided with the main characters’ views on those topics being discussed.

I’m not sure if I’m making much sense, but essentially, for a book being about politics, I didn’t feel overwhelmed by the politics.

Anyway. Let’s talk about the romance between the two main characters, because that’s usually what I read Becky Albertalli’s book for. That, and the diverse characters.

Jamie was Jewish. There were a lot of references about Jewish culture, like his sister’s Bat Mitzvah and how big of a deal it was. The first half of the story involved planning it. I’m not familiar with that kind of culture, so it was interesting to read about.

Maya was Muslim, which was apparent because, in the summary alone, there is mention of her celebrating Ramadan where she spends a good portion of the story fasting. Which, again, is something that I’m not familiar with so it was interesting to learn a bit about it through these characters’ interactions. Like Jamie trying to give Maya an ice coffee in the middle of her fast.

And can I just say that these two characters were absolutely adorable together? Because they were. There was an instance when Jamie was trying to get Maya to play a game on the Nintendo Switch, but he put her on the assisted mode. She thought she was killing it, but in reality, he was letting her win. It’s things like that that just melt my heart.

Overall, I really liked this book. Actually, more than that. I absolutely loved this book. I loved how diverse the characters were and the romance between Jamie and Maya. Becky Albertalli didn’t disappoint, and I’d definitely pick up Aisha Saeed’s books in the future. Because this book was great. I definitely recommend it, especially if you had read any of either authors’ other books.

Did you read this book? What’d you think of it? I’d love to chat about it in the comments below!

Published by The Reading Addict

I am a twenty-something-year-old who is an avid reader. I love anything from young adult fantasy to adult fiction to young adult contemporary.

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